In pictures: Tourism as Kenya’s money spinner

In pictures: Tourism as Kenya’s money spinner

Monday, May 9, 2016 11:54 am


Dr James at the park entrance

Dr James at the park entrance

By Raphael James

The Park2

The Park2


Lions at the park

Lions at the park

Buffaloes at the park

Buffaloes at the park


Other animals at the park

Other animals at the park

Nairobi National Park

Join me as we tour the ‘Nairobi National Park’, established in 1946. It is located approximately seven kilometres South of the centre of Nairobi with an electric fence separating the park’s wildlife from the metropolis. The animals, before now, roamed freely and sometimes walked into people’s houses!

I was told of a nearby hotel where a lion walked in, seen by occupants- don’t ask me what happened after.

Mervyn Cowie was the conservationist that started it all after his return to Kenya after a nine-year absence in 1932 and was alarmed to see that animals had reduced in number. He fought for the creation of the game reserve and, in 1946, it was officially opened. Thank God for the foresight of Mervyin and today Kenya is making so much money from the park.

Visiting the Nairobi Animal Orphanage

The Ophanage

The Ophanage


The Nairobi Animal Orphanage is located inside the Nairobi National Park. It serves as treatments and rehabilitation centre for wild animals.
Cheetahs at the ophanage

Cheetahs at the ophanage


Another section of the Ophanage

Another section of the Ophanage

The Orphanage hosts lions, cheetahs, hyenas, jackals, gazels, warthogs, leopards, various monkeys, baboons and buffalo. Various birds can also be viewed including parrots, guinea fowls, crowned cranes and ostriches.

Uhuru Gardens’ on Lang’ata Road, Nairobi

National Museum of Kenya

National Museum of Kenya


A 24-metre high monument commemorating Kenyas’ struggle for independence

A 24-metre high monument commemorating Kenyas’ struggle for independence

This is the largest memorial park in Kenya. The inaugural ceremony for Kenya’s first President, Jomo Kenyatta, was conducted at this park on December 12, 1963 when Kenya gained its independence.

A 24-metre high monument commemorating Kenyas’ struggle for independence is the centrepiece of attractions at Uhuru Gardens.

To one side of this monument is a statue of freedom fighters raising the Kenyan flag. Most of the trees in the garden are planted by prominent Kenyan citizens.

Nigeria, my beloved country that is diversifying its economy, has a lot to ;learn from Kenya.

Dr. Raphael James is the Director General at Center for Research, Information Management and Media Development, Lagos

Loading...

Join The Conversation

One Comment

  • Michael Markussen says:

    The Sable antilopes in the 5th picture dont live in NNP but only in Shimba Hills at the coast.

  • What do you think?

    This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.